Please Join Colorado State University’s Quantitative Cell & Molecular Biology Program for Our Annual Symposium


When:

May 5, 2022

Where:

TMI Event Hall

2350 Gillette Drive
Fort Collins, CO 80523

Register Here:

Registration Form

We will have a full day of in-person lectures and a student poster session with prizes for those voted best!

Invited Speakers
We have industry experts scheduled throughout the day to give lectures on a variety of topics involved in quantitative biology. See below for their bios!

Poster Session
All graduate students and post-docs are welcome to present on a topic of their choosing!

Cash prizes are available for:
– The top three student posters ($250, $150, $100)
– The top first-year student poster ($250)
– The top post-doc poster ($250)

*Note: When you register, you must indicate that you are interested in presenting a poster. Please be aware that the preferred poster size is 3′ x 4′ (W x H), and the maximum poster size is 4′ x 4′. More instructions regarding the poster competition will be emailed to those who register as presenters.

General Attendance
The symposium is open to the public, and anyone is allowed to come and view the poster sessions as well as the talks. We ask that you still register, though, as space is limited!

Schedule

Time
Activity
8:00 am

Continental Breakfast

8:30 am

Keynote Speaker: Mike Mangalea presents “Microbial Ecology Phingerprints for Disease Detection and Biomarker Development”

9:30 am

Career/Professional Development Speaker: Jenna Gallegos presents “Science communication: What is it? How do you do it? Can it be a career?”

10:30 am

Break

11:00 am

Invited Speakers

  1. 11:00 – 11:30: Sarah Swygert presents “Quiescent yeast: an emerging model of 3D chromatin structure”
  2. 11:30 – 12:00, Student Seminar: Kayl Ecton
12:00 pm

Lunch

1:00 pm

Invited Speakers

  1. 1:00 – 1:30: Dan Sloan presents “Detecting de novo mutations in some of the slowest evolving genomes on Earth”
  2. 1:30 – 2:00: Marcela Henao Tamayo presents “Spatial Transcriptomics to Evaluate Diverse Immune Environments in the Lungs”
  3. 2:00 – 2:30: Erin Nishimura presents “Insane in the Membrane: How the Plasma Membrane Acts as a Site for mRNA Accumulation and Local Translation”
2:30 pm

Student Posters: Displayed in the atrium

4:00 pm

Keynote Speaker: Brandon Hadland presents “Not All HSCs are Created Equal: Uncovering the Origin of Stemness in the Blood System by Single Cell Analysis”

5:00 – 7:00 pm

Reception: Poster Winner Announcements + CMB Celebrates with Graduates and Honorees

Meet the Speakers

  Website Icon, Transparent Website.PNG Images & Vector - FreeIconsPNG

Brandon K. Hadland, M.D., Ph.D.

Bio:

  • M.D./PhD (Molecular Cell Biology), Washington University, St. Louis
  • Pediatric residency, Seattle Children’s Hospital
  • Pediatric Hematology/Oncology fellowship, Fred Hutch/UW/Seattle Children’s Hospital

The overarching goals of research in my lab are two-fold. First, we aim to uncover the factors that regulate the developmental origin and fate decisions of hematopoietic stem cells responsible for sustaining life-long blood cell production. Second, we seek to understand how dysfunction in these regulatory mechanisms interacts with blood cell ontogeny to cause pediatric leukemias. Ultimately, we hope that clinical translation of our work will be used to expand hematopoietic stem cells to improve transplantation outcomes, facilitate gene therapy for treatment of inherited blood disorders, and identify novel therapeutic strategies to cure pediatric leukemias.

Talk Title: Not All HSCs are Created Equal: Uncovering the Origin of Stemness in the Blood System by Single Cell Analysis

In Brief: The capacity to engineer hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) de novo would facilitate transformative applications in disease modeling and treatment of benign and malignant hematologic disorders. Imperative to this goal is improving our understanding of the developmental biology of HSCs, including their embryonic ontogeny and the unique niche signals required for their specification and self-renewal.  I will discuss my lab’s research using niche models for HSC development ex vivo to probe the phenotypic, functional, and transcriptional properties of HSC precursors at single cell resolution. Our work has begun to elucidate the distinct transcriptional programs that guide nascent HSC specification and the signaling interactions that promote HSC self-renewal in the embryonic vascular niche.

Black google blog search icon - Free black google icons   Twitter logo   Linkedin Icons | Download Free Vectors Icons & Logos   Website Icon, Transparent Website.PNG Images & Vector - FreeIconsPNG

Jenna Gallegos, Ph.D.

Bio:

  • Bachelors in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology (CU)
  • PhD in Plant Biology with a designated emphasis in biotechnology (UC Davis)

Jenna Gallegos is a science communicator, writer, and marketing professional with over ten years of research experience and over forty published science news stories. Trained as a molecular biologist, Jenna got her PhD at the University of California in Davis, where she studied intron-driven gene regulation in plants. After graduate school, Jenna worked as a science journalist at the Washington Post before returning to academia for a postdoc in synthetic biology. She is currently the Director of Scientific Marketing at Samba Scientific, a life science-focused marketing agency. Jenna also writes for the Alliance for Science and Synbiobeta.

Talk Title: Science communication: What is it? How do you do it? Can it be a career?

In Brief: Communication is incredibly important between scientists and between scientists, policy-makers, and the general public. But we’re not very good at it. In this talk, a seasoned science communicator will discuss how to talk and write about science in an effective and engaging way, whether you are in a research-focused role or one of many emerging science communication careers.

Website Icon, Transparent Website.PNG Images & Vector - FreeIconsPNG

Mike Mangalea, Ph.D.

CDC – Atlanta

Talk Title: Microbial Ecology Phingerprints for Disease Detection and Biomarker Development

Website Icon, Transparent Website.PNG Images & Vector - FreeIconsPNG

Sarah G. Swygert, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Colorado State University

Talk Title: Quiescent yeast: An Emerging Model of 3D Chromatin Structure

Website Icon, Transparent Website.PNG Images & Vector - FreeIconsPNG

Dan Sloan, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Biology Department at Colorado State University

Talk Title: Detecting de Novo Mutations in some of the Slowest Evolving Genomes on Earth

Website Icon, Transparent Website.PNG Images & Vector - FreeIconsPNG

Erin Osborne Nishimura, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Colorado State University

Talk Title: Insane in the Membrane: How the Plasma Membrane Acts as a Site for mRNA Accumulation and Local Translation

Website Icon, Transparent Website.PNG Images & Vector - FreeIconsPNG

Marcela Henao Tamayo, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology at Colorado State University

Talk Title: Spatial Transcriptomics to Evaluate Diverse Immune Environments in the Lungs

Thank You to Our Sponsors!